The Summit draws change-minded student entrepreneurs from all over the world to attend our annual conference at Northwestern University. In the past ten years, more than 45 countries have been represented at GES.

GES accepts applications for projects of any topic, any size and any stage of implementation. Some delegates come with an idea for a project they’re hoping to start in the future, and some delegates come with an already existing organization they’re trying to make more effective.

Delegate projects cover a wide range of topics — from healthcare to education to microfinance to the environment. We’re open to any solutions-driven idea that strives to create a positive impact in the world. We believe a wide range of projects and backgrounds allows delegates to be resources to one another.

DELEGATE SPOTLIGHT:
SAMIR GOEL

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2015 delegate Samir Goel, an undergraduate student at New York University, is co-founder of Transfernation, a nonprofit that uses technology and volunteers to reallocate leftover food from corporate and academic events toward underserved communities. Their mission is simple: “Redistribute. Repurpose. Restore.” Goel is determined to eliminate waste culture in the U.S.

Transfernation took two years to brainstorm, develop and pitch. To date, it has rescued 6,000 pounds of food, hosted 130 events and established 20 partnerships. Every week Transfernation redistributes about 500 pounds of food and impacts up to 300 lives.

Hunger, in many ways is a man-made problem as we currently waste more than enough food to end hunger. While there is no one size fits all solution, we all have a role to play in solving this challenge. It is the first time in human history where we can have meaningful dialogue on ending global social challenges and as a result no contribution is insignificant.

This October, the organization will release a smartphone app to streamline the volunteer coordination process. They also plan to partner with transportation companies to secure pro bono services and venture beyond the U.S. to develop similar programs in the U.K. and Pakistan.